Somebody Threw A Shoe At Bush — Hooray!

An Iraqi cameraman threw his shoes at President Bush at a Baghdad news conference, literally hurling a deadly insult at him. Apparently he’s being hailed as a hero by “thousands” of protesters around Iraq. (Of course, “thousands” of Iraqis will seemingly turn out at a car crash, so I’m not particularly impressed by the numbers.)

It seems to be lost on him, and them, that it’s entirely due to George Bush that he can commit assault on a visiting allied foreign head of state and not find himself being slowly fed into a wood chipper*, and that demonstrators can protest that his free speech should be protected without their families being rounded up and thrown in a dungeon.

So my response isn’t really anger or disgust at his behavior.

It’s more like you’re welcome.

* He’s in jail for the time being, just like I’d expect an American protestor who threw something at al-Maliki on a U.S. visit would be.

2 thoughts on “Somebody Threw A Shoe At Bush — Hooray!

  1. Rob

    It seems to be lost on him, and them, that it’s entirely due to George Bush that he can commit assault on a visiting allied foreign head of state and not find himself being slowly fed into a wood chipper*, and that demonstrators can protest that his free speech should be protected without their families being rounded up and thrown in a dungeon.

    Pointing that out without recognizing that some other things are going on in Iraq right now that might be the proximate cause for hostility towards the US (and its President) is very much like telling Mrs. Lincoln she should be grateful for the Ford Theater box seats she got for Our American Cousin.

    It might not seem a big deal to someone who’s declared victory, but a bombing that kills 50 in Iraq is equivalent to one that kills 500 in the US. If we were getting regular Oklahoma City bombings in the middle of a Chinese occupation of the United States after a 5+ year round of bombings and ethnic cleansings, with 20 million or so refugees in Canada and Mexico, I doubt we’d be overflowing with generosity and loving kindness during a visit of the Chinese head of state.’

    That doesn’t excuse any of it… it just re-emphasizes that it’s time for us to go and let the Iraqis be responsible for themselves and their fate.

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  2. Alan

    Although I would totally agree in principle about the newfound right to free speech and the progress towards establishing the rule of law, I can’t bring myself to feel smug about it.

    The failures of 2002-2004 by our government for domestic political purposes, specifically the constant soft-pedaling about conditions on the ground as things deteriorated to protection political careers and reelections, constitute a massive failure of America to look after its responsibilities in Iraq.

    After such treatment, and after leaving Iraqis to live with no order, little security, completely inadequate utilities and government services, a shattered economy, non-functional government bureaucracies, and a marginally functional but mostly corrupt government for years while US politicians played damage control, blame games, buck passing, flat-out denial, meaningless media propaganda dog-and-pony shows, manipulation of statistics, and flag-waving rhetoric; I can’t blame Iraqis for being angry. I am ashamed that our government was more interested in CYA than trying to address the real problems as they happened. The failure was not one of the troops, but one of leadership allowing warring domestic ideologies to trump the truth and real-world obligations.

    For that, I can’t blame Iraqis for being ungrateful.

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